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  • Georgia Murphy

Instagram Page Raises Concerns Over Cyberbullying on Social Media


Students Looking At Their Phones / Credits: Georgia Murphy


The @sww2026confessions account was active during the last few weeks of summer and focused on the current sophomore class of School Without Walls. The account owner created a Google Form that asked students to anonymously answer questions about their classmates and posted the responses to an Instagram story that was accessible for only 24 hours.


A follower of the account who wished to remain anonymous explained that the account’s posts grew more malicious over time. “At first, it was fun and [then] people started getting a little bit meaner,” the source said. “They started insulting other people. And I think it kind of reached a breaking point.”


After the account had become harmful, one student who wishes to remain anonymous decided to report the @sww2026confessions to Walls administration. This student explained that they took action because they believe that such accounts are damaging to the school’s community. “It makes people feel really bad about themselves and it makes us paranoid of what others are saying about us behind our backs,” they said.


In response to the report, Walls administrators implemented multiple strategies. They coordinated several school-wide anti-cyberbullying seminars. These seminars included a video on the effects of cyberbullying, a discussion on why bullying is harmful, and a statement of DCPS’ policies. In addition, the administration reported the incident to the Cluster Superintendent and Mental Health Teams. Finally, they contacted the various targets of the account and offered mental health resources.


Principal Sylvia Issac said, “engaging in this kind of behavior does not encourage positive relationships in any way in the school. If students have encountered any bullying they should report it … It’s so important that we’re able to quickly address the situation,” she said.


Some students believe that the administration should have conducted an additional investigation to uncover the identity of the account’s owner. However, whether such an investigation occurred and the extent of its success is unclear.


Ms. Isaac said, “administration takes bullying very seriously. When more can be done… we’re going to investigate. We’re going to find out who’s involved and we’re going to see if consequences are warranted. And if there are, that’s what will happen.”


The anonymous reporter of the account explained that the administration had reached a stalemate with their investigations. “A friend and I went to Ms. Kosin to talk about the incident, and she said the school was doing all they really could,” they said.


As students still do not have all of the facts, many have turned to rumors for information. As one target of the account who wished to remain anonymous explained, “words get passed around and the truth gets mixed up.” In any case, the identity of the facilitator is still unknown to students.


Some students believe that the administration’s response to the account was unproductive. Another anonymous target of the account said, “I don’t think that lecturing the entire grade was very effective … The whole grade [had to] sit through like 50 assemblies all about the same thing.” The student described the assemblies, which referenced outdated social media platforms like MySpace, as “tone-deaf.”


The student expressed that the administration’s response was disproportionate to what the situation warranted. They said, “for me it’s just something to have a conversation about,” explaining that “It was just … rumors and gossip.” They also explained that the account didn’t really affect them. “I’ve learned not to take things like that seriously,” they said.


Ms. Isaac also believes that if these incidents can be avoided, the school will benefit. “We all belong in a community. That means that each and every person brings to the community something that is unique, something that may be different, but something that should be celebrated … So first and foremost, it means respect,” she said

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